Just One Day
Reading/Social Studies Provide the students with books such as One Nation: America Remembers September 11, 2001 (Little, Brown, 2001), books about D-Day, Pearl Harbor, the day Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, the day Columbus landed on what became the United States of America, etc. Divide the class into groups and have each group choose one historic day to research and on which to report. How can one day change the whole world? Do we ever have advance knowledge of which days will change the world? What might be some signs of an upcoming historic day? How can we be ready to be a positive influence on any such day? What kinds of things might the students be able to do, individually or as a group, to help change the world for the better? The students can present their findings and opinions in the form of oral reports, computer slide presentations, character dress-ups, etc.

9/11 Anniversary
September 11, 2011, marks the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers in New York City, the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia and Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. To help students understand the events of this fateful day, Thinkfinity has provided a collection of lesson plans, artifacts and interactives that will help your students understand the impact of the September 2001 events, and how they still affect our nation to this day.

Teaching with Historic Places is featuring lesson plans related to America's battle for independence, the creation of our nation, and other lessons with related Independence Day themes. These lessons, based on sites listed in the National Register of Historic Places, are free and ready for immediate classroom use.

Unknown Soldier Diorama
Students learn about the history of honoring unknown soldiers in their country, such as the hallowed ground in Arlington Cemetery, Virginia, or elsewhere. Then students will research the origins and building of the tombs for unknown soldiers in the country of their choice. Finally, students will create a diorama depicting a national memorial to unknown soldiers.

Teaching With Documents: Lesson Plans
This section contains reproducible copies of primary documents from the holdings of the National Archives of the United States, teaching activities correlated to the National History Standards and National Standards for Civics and Government, and cross-curricular connections.

No Rest for the Weary
In this lesson, students create sections of a timeline illustrating key events in the life of Abraham Lincoln from 1862-1864. Students will use the New York Times article announcing the opening of a new museum dedicated to President Lincoln as a springboard for their work.

Free Activities and Educational Articles